The educational significance of Hallowe'en: a survey of current practice and teacher attitudes in British primary schools

Plater, M. (2004) The educational significance of Hallowe'en: a survey of current practice and teacher attitudes in British primary schools. Masters thesis, University of Birmingham.

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Abstract

This study explores the significance and meaning of the festival of Hallowe'en in past and present British culture, and particularly in respect of the present-day primary school curriculum. The results of a quantitative survey of 138 teachers from 28 schools in 3 South East England local education authorities (LEA's) are presented. They indicate that, in spite of the ongoing popularity of practices associated with the festival among children, primary schools intentionally avoid the celebration and study of Hallowe'en. It is widely believed among teachers that teaching about the festival is in fact proscribed by LEA or school policy. Hostile attitudes towards Hallowe'en are particularly prevalent among members of certain church groups, and especially among those who identify themselves as Evangelical, Charismatic, or Fundamentalist in their religious perspective. School managers (head teachers, deputy heads and senior teachers) are also more likely to take an anti-Hallowe'en stance. The study suggests that, by avoiding this topic, teachers may in fact be doing a disservice to their children, by failing to engage with issues which are of genuine interest and concern to the young people in their care.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information: This item is available from the research repository at the University of Birmingham
Divisions: School of Humanities
Depositing User: Mark Plater
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2019 15:42
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2019 14:20
URI: http://bgro.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/509

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