Chief examiners as Prophet and Priest: relations between examination boards and school subjects, and possible implications for knowledge

Puttick, S. (2015) Chief examiners as Prophet and Priest: relations between examination boards and school subjects, and possible implications for knowledge. The Curriculum Journal, 26 (3). pp. 468-487. ISSN 0958-5176

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Abstract

Evidence from an ethnographic study of three secondary school geography departments in England is drawn on to describe aspects of the relationships between examination boards and school subjects. This paper focuses on one department, in ‘Town Comprehensive’, and the argument is illustrated through a discussion of observed lessons with a teacher in this department. Ofqual (Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation) have recently announced that examination boards may continue to endorse commercially available teaching resources. The argument presented in this paper extends possible areas of ‘risk’ identified beyond those they currently consider. Specifically, it is argued that chief examiners play multiple roles in the recontextualisation of knowledge, holding substantial power over school subjects. The strong role of accreditation as a rationale is argued to restrict knowledge taught in school geography to horizontal discourses, limiting students’ access to powerful knowledge.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published by Taylor & Francis. All rights reserved. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Divisions: School of Teacher Development
Depositing User: Dr Steven Puttick
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2016 16:08
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2019 14:19
URI: http://bgro.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/65

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