Evidence for the preferential incorporation of emotional waking-life experiences into dreams.

Malinowski, J.E. and Horton, C. (2014) Evidence for the preferential incorporation of emotional waking-life experiences into dreams. Dreaming, 24 (1). pp. 18-31. ISSN 1053-0797

[img]
Preview
Text
Horton_evidence for the_2019.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (952kB) | Preview

Abstract

The continuity hypothesis of dreaming states that waking life is continuous with dreams, but many of the factors that have been postulated to influence wake–dream continuity have rarely been studied. The present study investigated whether certain factors—emotional and stressfulness intensity, and certain types of experiences—influence the likelihood of a waking-life experience being incorporated into a dream. Participants (N = 32) kept dream diaries and waking-life experience logs for 14 consecutive days, and waking-life experiences were matched to dream reports. Waking-life experiences that were incorporated into dreams were significantly more emotional, but no more stressful, than those that were not incorporated into dreams. Major daily activities were incorporated significantly less than the combination of personally significant experiences, major concerns, and novel experiences. Results are discussed in terms of dream functionality, particularly in relation to a postulated emotional memory assimilation theory of dream function.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2014 American Psychological Association. This is an author accepted manuscript of a paper subsequently published in Dreaming. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Divisions: School of Social Science
Depositing User: Dr Caroline Horton
Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2019 14:34
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2019 14:20
URI: http://bgro.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/582

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item